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How Much Do Concrete Countertops Cost?

The cost for concrete countertops ranges from $65 to $150 per square foot on average. This price typically includes design, materials, construction, and installation. Although the cost can go up quite a bit depending on the shape you want and additional features like coloring, inlays, textures and special features. Concrete countertops are priced differently than traditional stone. With stone countertops like Quartz, Marble or Granite, the cost is predominately in the material. But concrete is relatively cheap when compared to stone. A concrete countertops price is more about the time and effort it takes to make them than in the material itself. Concrete countertops are generally one of a kind creations hand made on site for each customer.

The average cost for a concrete countertop is around $100 dollars per square foot.

Concrete countertops are often seen as a low cost alternative to using stone. But that’s not always the case. Many high end concrete countertop designs end up costing more than their stone counterparts. One of the reasons for this additional cost is the skilled labor it takes to create them. The finest concrete countertops are a created like a work of art rather than just a cut piece of stone.

In most cases, professional artisans actually make a concrete countertop by hand and on site specifically to the client’s needs. That’s a lot different from stone that’s cut in a factory and simply installed on site.

Basic Costs

For $65-$100 per square foot you’ll get a basic, gray concrete countertop. This price range includes no color, stain, polish or special features and square corners. It’s dull and stark but very Modern and a popular choice at the moment. Some of the finest Modern homes being built today are using super basic concrete countertops with no additional features at all. The style also works well in a Rustic or Country style home. I’ve also seen it done in a few Transitional style kitchen with great results.
I personally love concrete countertops when they’re left bare and raw. This price point is exactly how I like them. When you start coloring, polishing, texturing and adding special features I feel your getting away from the appeal of using concrete.

Basic concrete countertops include:

  • Basic design with straight edges
  • Standard cutouts for sinks and faucets
  • Natural color and finish options

For the overwhelming majority of homes, this is the style I would recommend. I think it’s a versatile look that looks fantastic in just about any home it’s used in. When paired with the right backsplash, cabinets and flooring, concrete countertops are a fabulous choice and a great alternative to stone.

Mid Priced Options

The next step up averages between $100-$135 per square foot. This price point adds options like stains, textures and additional polishes. If you like a more glossy finish and a bit of color then this is the right choice for you.

Keep in mind staining is different than coloring concrete. Stains are applied at the end after the concrete is poured and hardened. While color is included inside the concrete mix and runs all the way through the concrete. Some people even do a combination of color and staining for unique effects.

Mid-range countertop prices include:

  • The addition of texturing aggregates
  • Custom or decorative shapes or edge details
  • Increased color and finish options

Polishes are pretty self explanatory. They’re applied after the concrete has hardened and range from semi gloss to gloss just like paint does.

Texturing can be added as a top coat while the concrete is drying or in the mix. It’s similar to texturing the concrete around a pool and makes the countertops less slippery when wet.

High priced Options

The last price bump averages $135+ per square foot. This price point adds options like extra thick countertops, special edge designs, multi coloring options, castings, aggregate designs, inlays, drainboards, trivets and other artistic features.
High-end countertops prices include:

  • Thicker countertops and unique edge designs
  • Elaborate shapes including radius work
  • Custom or multi-colored options
  • Creative castings
  • Special aggregate designs
  • Custom inlays, drainboards or trivets
  • Artistic features

Coloring your concrete adds about the same amount to the price as staining, which is around 5-10 dollars per square foot. The exact price depends on the color you choose and amount needed to produce the desired colors. The pigment is typically added into the mix, although there are topical colors that can be put on after the concrete has been poured.

Coloring and staining can be done together to add even more artistic effect. A multi-colored option can easily cost $20+ per sq. ft. based on the look your going for. The more elaborate and time consuming the design, the more it costs.

The high end price point includes just about any option you can think of and is priced accordingly by the installer. I’ve seen some elaborate concrete countertops built and none have ever cost more than $200 per. sq.ft. so I believe that’s probably the ceiling unless you wanted something really crazy like a gold inlay.

Additional Costs

Unique shapes or curves, colors, stains, and textures all add to the cost of the job. But although options do raise the price, they allow for more creativity and a one of a kind finish.

  • Countertops with unique shapes like curves will cost more. Sometimes as much as $100 extra per square foot in the area that has the curves.
  • Custom edging or added thickness.
  • Custom coloring can cost over $500 extra for the typical kitchen countertops. But this price varies quite a bit based on the colors you choose and the pattern.
  • A concrete backsplash can also add to your cost. Usually these are built off site and then installed later. The cost is roughly the same per sq. ft. as the countertop.
  • A stain resistant countertop finish also adds a bit to the price.
  • Adding supports for overhangs, such as a large island countertop, can add to the price. These sections can also be reinforced from the inside at additional cost.
  • Unique design options are generally priced based on a time and material agreement.

While these features add style and uniqueness to the countertop. They add cost. And remember the more specific you go with your design, the less appealing it can be to the majority of buyers. In my experience we get the best results from a basic concrete countertop with square edges and a natural appearance using nothing more than a sealer.

Cost Summary

With a price range spanning $50 – $175+, there’s a lot you can do with concrete countertops. They’re pretty much all custom made on site so if you can dream it up I’m sure there’s an installer that can build it for you. But when it comes to concrete, less tends to be a lot more.

With all these expensive and artistic options available, I think concrete countertops are getting a little too overly complicated. The basic raw poured concrete with square edges and a natural finish looks the best to me and works in just about any home I use them in.

Hiring A Pro Vs. DIY

Although pouring your own concrete countertops may seem easy and a good way to save money, it isn’t. Concrete counters are very heavy and difficult to build. Building forms and pouring in place requires knowledge and experience with concrete mixes, pouring, curing and the finishing processes. It also requires the right tools and equipment.

But, if you have the tools and skill, pouring your own concrete countertops is definitely a possibility and a great way to save money.

The bulk of the cost for concrete countertops is the labor. The time and skill it takes to create these is much more than the cost of concrete and the forms. And it pays to hire a pro. Concrete isn’t easy to work with and there’s a lot that can go wrong. If what you want is a top quality professional finish then you need a professional installer.

The prices we’ve talked about earlier are all in. Labor, installation, forms, concrete, coloring, aggregate, etc. Just like with stone countertops, you should hire a pro that gives you one final price so there are no hidden fees or surprises.

Also make sure the finished product is guaranteed. There’s a lot that can go wrong when working with concrete even when a pro is doing the work. If major mistakes happen then the countertop will have to be redone.

But keep in mind, pouring a custom concrete countertop isn’t like picking out a stone that’s cut perfectly by a machine in a factory. Imperfect edges, surfaces and small pores can be a part of the deal. If what you want is a factory finish then buy a factory made concrete countertop. Don’t custom make one on site.

What’s Included In The Cost

Professional concrete countertops come either precast or cast in place.

Precast means built in a factory and sent the desired size. This is the same process as buying stone countertops. They’re installed on site but made somewhere else. Before the slabs ever get to you, they’ve already been formed, poured, sealed, cut, colored, polished, textured, etc.

Cast In Place means custom made on site. When pros build on site, they typically clean and level the surface, take measurements, build forms right on your existing cabinets and then pour concrete. The countertops are custom made right in your own home and a final inspection is made at the end.

With either method, both the countertops, materials and installation is included in the price. The only difference is that some concrete countertops are made in a factory and some on site.

Some pros include a warranty with the countertops in case there’s a defect with the concrete. I recommend you get one just in case.

Finding The Right Pro

Like most things, prices for a concrete countertop can vary based on who’s making them. It’s a man mad product so prices can vary quite a bit based on the quality of the finished product.

You can call around and get the best price but I don’t recommend it. Concrete countertops aren’t like buying stone because they’re not all created equal. With stone countertops, the company doesn’t make the granite. All they do is cut it. Now some granite is better than others but assuming one company gives you a better price for the same material, you should probably take it. But concrete doesn’t work like that.

When it comes to concrete countertops, there’s a lot of skill involved to create them. The forms have to be built perfectly and concrete should be poured in a way that doesn’t leave bubbles and weak spots. There’s also a lot of skill required if you want polishes, color, stains, aggregate, curves, inlays, and other custom work. Shop for a good deal but make sure you hire someone that has experience and does good work. Concrete is very easy to mess up.

The best prices are typically found in the slow season, which is normally around late fall or early winter. Don’t even try hiring a company here in NJ in the Spring or Summer because work is booming and prices rise. Booking off season will ensure a better price and sometimes a better job because the workers aren’t as rushed.

DIY Concrete Countertops

The basic materials you need to build your own concrete countertops are forms, concrete and some basic tools. In total, you can expect to pay around $20 bucks per sq.ft. for the forms and concrete if your using wood. Premade forms cost a bit more but they’re very convenient.

The tools you’ll need depends on the options your using. For a basic countertop all you need is a mixing tray or wheel barrow, trowels, bucket, sponges to clean up, a flat edge bar to level the concrete, and whatever you need to build the forms. The tools needed to build concrete countertops aren’t that expensive.Even if you don’t own a single tool you could buy everything you need for under $250 bucks.

Just like if you hired a pro, the biggest investment in doing it yourself is time. While you do save the money you’d pay to a pro, you’ll have to put in all that time yourself. And it’s not an easy project.

Costs:

  • Concrete Mix. 80 lb. bags are generally around $6
  • Color. Colors typically range between $6 -$15 per sq.ft.
  • Silicone. You can buy it for around $5 per tube. An average countertop only needs one tube.
  • Power Sander. Expect to pay around $50 bucks for a good one which includes some sandpaper.
  • Painters Tape. Under $10. I recommend Frog Tape.
  • Wire Mesh. It’s a good idea to add some wire mesh to your countertop to strengthen it up. It only costs around 50 cents p.s.f.
  • Sealer. Under $3 p.s.f. will buy you a good one.
  • Framing. Typically it costs us under $100 for an average size kitchen which includes all the screws.
  • Release Spray. You don’t need it but I like to use a little release spray which helps remove the molds after the concrete cures.

Additional Supplies

Here are some other tools you’ll probably need to complete the job.

  • Concrete Mixer. Mixing tubs, a wheelbarrow, shovel and trowels are all good things to have.
  • Table Saw. If you want to cut the forms as accurate as possible then a good table saw comes in handy.
  • Mallet. Great for banging the forms which releases air bubbles.
  • Power Drill. You’ll need one to screw the forms together.
  • Tape Measure. Another must have for making accurate forms.
  • Caulk Gun. A necessity for applying the silicone.

Building concrete countertops yourself is a great way to save a lot of money, as long as you have the skills and tools to do the job.

Upkeep Costs

Maintaining your concrete is also an important part of the cost. At the time of the installment, it needs to be sealed.You can buy a concrete sealer at Home Depot for under $1.00 per sq.ft.

I highly recommend buying a concrete sealer that’s for indoor use and labeled green and safe to use around food. Don’t just buy any concrete sealer because many contain chemicals you wouldn’t want around your food.

Concrete countertops need to be re-sealed every 1 to 2 years just like granite. Concrete is a porous material that can hold bacteria. A sealer helps keep the countertop clean and safe by filling up all those little holes.

To check if your concrete needs to be resealed simply spray some water on it. Water on a sealed concrete surface will bead up, if it doesn’t bead then you need more sealer.

Additional Costs To Consider

Shipping. This can be an additional charge for both precast concrete countertops and cast on site. All that material has to get on site somehow, and for large scale countertops, it may be too much to pick up.

Demo. If you have existing countertops then they’ll have to be removed prior to installing the new ones. And disposed of. Both of which cost money.

Cuts. If pipes or a sink need to be cut out of the concrete then this can cost more.

Comparison To Other Countertop Options

The price for concrete countertops generally falls into the mid-range of countertop options unless you want something custom. Typically, concrete is more expensive than tile, synthetic solids or laminate, about the same price as quartz or granite countertops and less expensive than marble.

The table below shows the average cost of each.

Wood $40 per square foot
Tile $20-$70 per square foot
Concrete $65+ per square foot
Granite $70-$175 per square foot
Quartz $80-$200 per square foot
Marble $100-$250 per square foot

Concrete is a fantastic countertop material that’s versatile and very in style at the moment. It’s heat resistant, scratch resistant, durable, looks great and can be custom made to fit your particular style.

While costs can put concrete countertops at the high end of the market, in general we find the average $100 per sq.ft. price range is the right one.

Summary: How Much Do Concrete Countertops Cost?

The cost for concrete countertops ranges from $65 to $150 per square foot on average. This price typically includes design, materials, construction, and installation. Although the cost can go up quite a bit depending on the shape you want and additional features like coloring, inlays, textures and special features. Concrete countertops are priced differently than traditional stone. With stone countertops like Quartz, Marble or Granite, the cost is predominately in the material. But concrete is relatively cheap when compared to stone. A concrete countertops price is more about the time and effort it takes to make them than in the material itself. Concrete countertops are generally one of a kind creations hand made on site for each customer.

The average cost for a concrete countertop is around $100 dollars per square foot.

Concrete countertops are often seen as a low cost alternative to using stone. But that’s not always the case. Many high end concrete countertop designs end up costing more than their stone counterparts. One of the reasons for this additional cost is the skilled labor it takes to create them. The finest concrete countertops are a created like a work of art rather than just a cut piece of stone.

In most cases, professional artisans actually make a concrete countertop by hand and on site specifically to the client’s needs. That’s a lot different from stone that’s cut in a factory and simply installed on site.

If you have any questions or comments e-mail us any time. We’d love to hear from you.

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